Over the pond and far away..Day 6

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Sydney ?…….. where’s that?

I think it was true to say that both of us were getting slightly concerned that, yet again, we were eating slightly more than our bodies required, so decided that a light breakfast of cereal and yogurt would suffice. We had made , however, a major tactical error…..we were sitting within smelling distance of the waffle-making department. Many things I can resist but not waffles, especially with fruit, and so I have no excuse. Lady of the House can make her own excuses. But I not going to lose any sleep over it……in any case it was a rather miserable grey, cloudy morning and we needed a bit of colour in our lives.

When I originally looked-up Sydney in my little Berlitz book of Canada, it got no mention, and a brief look on Google only told me about a very large violin situated at the port, (Spirit of the Fiddle) which you see pictured above. OK, at least that was something…..but what else? We could have gone on a tour about coal-mining or re-lived history at the Fortress of Louisbourg, but neither appealed…

However, after a fairly-long tender journey we landed in light rain, to a neat harbour, including a pleasant-looking restaurant, and a memorial to those immigrants who came to settle in the area….maybe an example to us all to recognise the part that immigrants can play in the development of a country.

It seemed a pleasant area, and impressed as we were with the architecture, and the lovely gardens, we decided that a perambulation through the houses were about as much as we could expect from this little town.

……Loved the little seat inviting passers-by to take a rest, and I never discovered who the chap in the red coat and tricorn hat is….maybe a ghost from years gone by?

It was then that we came upon the oldest building in Sydney. Built in 1785, St George’s Anglican Church was open with lights on…so in we went. My eyes lit on the little organ, and it did not take much prompting from anyone to get me to have a little play. Whilst experimenting with the stops, and trying out some hymns, a number of people started to come in from outside (maybe they were just coming out of the rain!), and it was suggested that I could come back in to give a recital and attract more people in! Then a gentleman came up and handed me a handful of Canadian dollars…..he may have thought I was the organist! Oh well, more for the church funds! They were very loyal to the Crown, and the Queen Mother had visited some long time ago.

As if that wasn’t interesting enough, we came upon a Hearing Aid Centre (which was my profession!), so we went in and chatted with the Audiologist. Enquiring as to which manufacturer she uses most and it turned out that it was the company for which I was UK Sales Manager for nearly 10 years!

….and finally, we sat on the Tender back to the ship, with a woman who turned-out to be a speech pathologist, and many professional comments were exchanged. So, after all, a day which we thought might have been unexciting, turned out memorable, and the rest of the day on the ship paled into insignificance……. so the lesson is…… CARPE DIEM

Over the pond and far away..Day 7

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Halifax, Nova Scotia ………and friends!

This town is one of the large number of places in this area which reflect back to the home-lands of many of the immigrants who have been involved in its historical, and present, life. If you just look around your atlas you will recognise so many names (at least if you are from the UK).in fact Dartmouth was just across the water, by ferry, as we later saw.

A few special things we were told we should see were to be the Citadel, the Titanic Cemetery where many of those who lost their lives, rest together, the Waterfront, and if time permitted, Point Pleasant Park………..

[However….last year, on a family Adriatic cruise, we had met a lovely Canadian couple, Norman and  Jennifer. To say that they were outgoing would be an understatement…it fact, they were ideal friends during the cruise, and we thoroughly enjoyed their company. We didn’t know exactly where they lived but we knew it was somewhere around there.]

So when Lady of the House decided last year which cruise this was to be, I felt it would be worthwhile contacting these good people to ask what we should see in the area. When they heard that Halifax was one of the included ports, they immediately suggested that they could pick us up at the ship and show us the local sights….so what could be better?

We felt a bit like executives being met, with our name on a signboard….as if we could miss these good people! I am tempted to post a photo from last year’s cruise , of Norman with a bra on….but I promised faithfully not to!

So we were getting a drive-round guided tour, and a number of my photos would have to be taken from the car.It would not have been easily-possible in the UK, with the stop/start rather erratic driving style which we use, but as I said earlier, drivers seem are much more sympathetic to road conditions and pedestrians so it was not as difficult as I expected.

[What I still find strange, wandering round the world, is that most other people and places are just like us! There is a certain ‘universality’ at play, which is not really surprising, I suppose, with instant communication, social media, and the wonderful Google Earth….we all find out about things at the same time. This would not have been possible 100 years ago when we would have heard of myths from far-away lands, and large chunks of the atlas would be marked…‘HERE THERE BE DRAGONS’]

Halifax’s natural harbour is one of the world’s largest, and was developed by the British in the mid-18th Century as a garrison, before becoming a base for fishermen. An obvious haven for pirates, it is believed that Samuel Cunard founded his transatlantic shipping line, based on this….but please do not quote me! The wide, clean, tree-lined roads were a pleasure to be on as we moved around at a leisurely pace….

We headed northwest of the town, to the Fairview Lawn Cemetery where we saw the dignity and respect with which this area and many of those who perished in the Titanic disaster, is tended. It was here I captured my favourite shot of the holiday, a blue jay, peeping round a tree looking at a gravestone from an earlier era.

After a few moments reflection, we moved towards the Citadel, seeing more lovely  buildings, and a warning sign which might be useful in our country..

The Citadel (the star-shape is only evident from above) was built in the year that Halifax was founded by Great Britain,in 1749, and occupied an elevated position, which would present us with a wonderful view over the city and harbour. A cannon-shot has been fired every day at noon since the 1850’s. You may also note the French text is still in evidence.

So many other visual memories of Halifax, including the Public Park, could be recorded, but the following are the main ones before we headed off for lunch…

A ferry took us over to Dartmouth…and one on-board photo showed how much fun we had…P1080094.JPG

The Harbour and the Wooden Monkey restaurant were certainly worth a photo as were the drinks….the nearest they had to Guinness….

I must be frank, folks, and admit that I have not yet come to terms with their chips……but the fish cakes, rice and salad were excellent! On the way back to the ship I had the chance to get some more shots of this great area..

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And this was our final photo taken with our lovely friends, Norman and Jennifer. Hopefully we can return the favour, some day, in Auld Scotia….

P.S.as a matter of record, it was taken by a young couple, who was looking for the Titanic Graveyard, and who were then taken there by our friends, to save them hunting for it….how wonderfully-typical.

Symbolically, we were sent on our way by a piper (Scottish or Canadian), as we left Canada for the last time, and headed towards the Grand Old U.S. of A.

Over the pond, and far away….Day 5

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Charlottetown, PEI

Not a place to hide an allegiance to the maple leaf, Charlottetown proudly welcomes you to this delightful area. If you look on the atlas you can see a few important geographical points…..firstly we were only able to approach it from the east, in other words we came the ‘long way round’, presumably because of a bridge/ causeway in the Northumberland Strait, connecting PEI to the mainland ……secondly, it has a couple of islands to its north-east (Iles de la Madeleine, uncannily like the shape of Santorini, but at a different angle)……and thirdly it is well-hidden and sheltered from storms.

Unlike our usual mornings, this was rather grey and overcast, but feeling prepared with a substantial breakfast, including porridge, we headed for the tenders/lifeboats. It’s only when you are at water level, and looking up, that the size of the vessel is realised….We understand that as Tenders they are to carry 90 persons, but when used as Lifeboats they can take 120!….quite tiny people, I imagine. However they were quite comfortable, and enabled the ship to anchor in one of the ‘corners’ of this port area.

When ashore , the Good Lady had the chance to see the little shops at the port, and I could get my Wi-Fi. We also took the chance to book a tour to satisfy the need for the Good Lady to witness at first hand, the origin of the book ‘Ann of Green Gables’…..one of many books written by Lucy Maud Montgomery, a local of PEI. For those who want to know more, she also wrote her memoirs as a book ‘The Alpine Path’.

One lovely little sentence is all I will quote…‘I have grubbed away industriously all this summer and ground out stories and verses on days so hot that I feared my very marrow would melt and my grey matter be hopelessly be sizzled up’.Did you note that there was not even a comma in the sentence, as if she were in a hurry to write it down, to get on with writing something else?

We had time to spend before the tour, so headed into this immaculate little town……I will let some photos do the talking…..

It’s a lovely little town, clean, and fresh, with the local pride very evident. Well worth exploring further…..And so we set off, with our coach driver, Earl, heading north-west from Charlottetown to get to the pilgrimage site, but the fox on the roadside was only a blur as we passed-by.

There was a short video about the Centre, and we were then able to wander at large, round the house and farm steading. It was of more interest to the ladies, but all the gentlemen seemed to endure the process sympathetically. For those ladies who have not been here, the following photos may engender an interest in a visit…..and don’t miss the bonnet!

One of the lovely people on the tour was a cruise member, whom we had already met, a few times. She was originally from Hong Kong, but her parents moved to the States many years ago, when there were worries over the future of the colony. Seemingly they had witnessed many things which worried them and felt it safer to be in Europe or the States. She had settled-in well, and her English was impeccable. Despite telling us of communism and commercialism, her humour and laugh were greatly infectious. Her genuine friendship was very evident, so we hope that we can keep in touch…

And so this little adventure came to an end. We had only had the chance to see one small corner of this lovely island, but could easily be persuaded to come back. A car would be necessary, but only small distances are involved with a wealth of coves, villages and the North East Tourist Trail to explore.  Meanwhile we leave you good people to your lovely isle.

Google Earth, and YouTube, here I come, to have an in-depth look and to make my list of ‘must-see’ places for the next time.